KNEE-DEEP IN PLOTTING

August 28, 2007 at 4:22 pm 2 comments

I know it may seem ass backwards to outline, write the synopsis, figure out plot points, after you’ve written the book, at least to the plotters out there. For me it makes logical sense. How else will I know how to tighten my story if I don’t know what happens when?

I’ve said this before, I treat my novel like a road map of my story. It’s far from being done once I write THE END.

So what am I doing now?

I had my mother buy me the 300 pack of index cards. I’ve written down the catalyst for my novel and pinned it to my cork board to remind myself why I wrote the book in the first place. I’m 127 pages in and my hands are crapping from all the notes I’m taking. But the most important ones are the turning points and what I call the minor turning points.

The trick I learned is to write around those BIG moments in the book, where something HUGE happens to the character. They might not know it but they can’t turn back, they can’t be who they used to be. Phoenix’s first minor turning point is deciding to go back home for her mother’s funeral. Once she steps foot out her car her life will never be the same. She won’t feel the same about herself, and her journey to the fourth and final turning point is already set in stone and she can’t stop it. Hell, she doesn’t even know it’s coming. The first major turning point is the funeral. I won’t get into detail, but something inside Phoenix shifts after she sees her mother dead.

With that I’m in the strange place of revising. I have to be objective, (when to cut scenes or flesh them out) yet at the same time I still have to hear my character’s voice. I may have to plug in scenes that I missed on my rush to the end and I can’t do that if I can’t feel my character anymore. It’s a strange limbo type of feeling.

What’s complete objectivity? When I’m sending my book out the door to publishers as something saleable.

Oh, a little sidebar. It’s kind of hard to edit a sex scene when your 3 year old son is trying to sit in your lap.

Who said writing was easy?

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Entry filed under: the process, writing.

MIDDLE NAME MEME BURNING UP THE SHEETS

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Allie Boniface  |  August 29, 2007 at 11:20 pm

    No one who actually does it said writing was easy. No one 🙂

  • 2. Mel  |  August 30, 2007 at 12:17 am

    Yes, people who have never sat down to write a book think it’s a piece of cake.

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